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The war so far ...

Smart-Woods was one of Canada's biggest manufacturers of bags, cloth, canvas, and clothing, but its products were barely mentioned in this advertising magazine, which offered a statistical compendium of the nations involved in the First World War.

Sacklopedia.pdf (9.41 MB)

Useful gifts for soldier boys

It was up to Canadians at home to remember their loved ones overseas with the odd gift - bought, of course, from a local retailer.

Made in Canada

This multilingual decal was made in 1943, likely to affix to Canadian war materiel, perhaps vehicles, being exported.

Buy Canadian!

During the Second World War, the federal government aggressively promoted a "buy Canadian" strategy, to prevent an outflow of currency to pay for foreign-made goods.

The war so far ...

Because so much of the fighting took place in regions that were unfamiliar to Canadians, war maps were enormously popular, for they simplified complicated events and allowed civilians to make sense of news coming from the war fronts.

The war from all sides

British press baron Lord Northcliffe published this contemporary history of the Great War, with proceeds going to the British Red Cross Society and the Order of St John.

Window shopping in wartime

These photographs, possibly taken in Vancouver, show a store window given over to advertising in support of War Savings Stamps.

Selling insurance with the flag

Using a verse by poet Frederick George Scott, an insurance company played on First World War patriotism as an advertising strategy.

Being a careful shopper

This modest pamphlet, published in Saint John, New Brunswick, was one of many that combined advertising with tips for women on how to cope with wartime shortages.

Homemaker.pdf (18.47 MB)

The Ghosts of Vimy Ridge

Longstaff's painting was hugely popular and widely reproduced, but was anyone offended when a funeral home distributed copies it for advertising purposes?