Advertisements

A wartime sales pitch

To capitalize on public sentiment, Dodds-Simpson Press offered specially inscribed bound volumes of a popular illustrated magazine to the families of Canadians in uniform - the addresses having been supplied by the federal government.

War Pictorial.pdf (38.39 MB)

In Flanders Fields

John McCrae's poem "In Flanders Fields" appeared in many advertisements during and after the First World War - but was it in poor taste for it to be used by a maker of surgical dressings?

Loose lips sink ships

In this mini-poster, a Canadian seaman urges people to keep quiet - inadvertently revealing sensitive military information might lead to the sinking of his ship.

Buy Canadian

This decal, probably intended to be affixed in a store window, reminded consumers that buying Canadian goods supported local workers and helped shore up the currency at the same time.

Shopping for uniform hats

One of the unintended consequences of war was a steep rise in demand for military uniforms, hats, badges, and other paraphernalia, demand that manufacturers were happy to meet.

The walls have ears

This advertisement encouraged Canadians to be particularly careful about what they said in hotels, for it was always possible that an enemy agent might be listening.

Rumour - Kill It!

This advertisement, which was produced in many different formats during the Second World War, urged Canadians to take a hard line against rumour-mongering.

The war in 1942 - from Maple Leaf Anti-Freeze

This folder, distributed by the company's Montreal headquarters, combined an advertisement for anti-freeze, consumer tips, advice on helping the war effort, and an informative war map.

Vote Liberal and win the war

Helen Smith and John Forester had won the British Columbia riding of Vancouver-Burrard for the Liberals in 1937 but in the 1941 provincial election, not even patriotic rhetoric could help them. The pair finished third, behind candidates from the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation and the Conservatives.

Pork at war

This advertisement used a modern version of the old nursery rhyme to show that 80% of Canadian pork production went overseas, to feed British civilians and Allied troops in Europe.