Returning

Preparing for the "Cease Fire"

In 1940, the Canadian Legion War Services launched a fund-raising drive to support the educational and social work it was doing with men in uniform, to help prepare them for the day when they would return to civilian jobs.

Help Plan.pdf (13.05 MB)

Standardized houses for soldier-settlers

This pamphlet provided plans for four standardized houses, each of which cost under $800 and could be built within eight days. In drawing up the plans, the Soldier Settlement Board's architect consulted "a number of leading Pioneer Women in the West."

Housing Plans.pdf (15.5 MB)

Veterans in need

The Soldiers' Aid Commission of Ontario, like similar groups established in other provinces during the First World War, was established to provide vocational, financial, and medical assistance to ex-soldiers and their families. Barrie native John McCreight never returned this registration card, so presumably at the time he was not in need of assistance.

Peace Day in London

The signing of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919 marked the end of the First World War, and people in many Allied countries celebrated the event by observing Peace Day in July 1919.

Peace Holiday.pdf (16.32 MB)

"Our pride in the past, our hope for the future"

Despite its title, this book was all about government programs available to Canadians after they stopped being soldiers and returned to the peacetime economy.

Welcome home to Manitoba

Tokens like this card were common after the First World War, but less so after the Second. It is also unusual in mentioning returning prisoners of war and those who had fallen sick.

Legitimate veterans

Because of problem of unscrupulous individuals claiming veteran status, anyone wearing a War Service Badge after the Second World War also had to carry proof that they were entitled to wear it.

Welcome back to the lakehead

The city of Port Arthur, Ontario, distributed scrolls to returning soldiers in 1919, to thank them for their efforts in defence of "Truth, Freedom, Home, and Native Land."

Learning a trade for peacetime

Part of the federal government's demobilization strategy was to make available to men and women in uniform job-training courses to prepare them for the postwar world. Corporal Nelson, of RCAF (Women's Division) Headquarters in Vancouver, opted to learn dressmaking.

Chatham welcomes its veterans home

Banquets in honour of returning servicemen and servicewomen were common in Canada in 1946, just as they had been in 1919.

Chatham banquet.pdf (13.83 MB)