Fighting

Recruiting in Toronto

Before the First World War was twelve months old, citizens' recruiting groups had swung into action to ensure that there were sufficient numbers of volunteers coming forward to reinforce Canadian units at the front.

The end in Italy

Canadian units had played a major role in the Italian campaign, but most of them had been transferred to north-west Europe when this message was conveyed from the Supreme Commander (and future governor-general of Canada), Harold Alexander.

Change of command in Italy

Richard McCreery took over the Eighth Army in Italy (including I Canadian Corps) from Oliver Leese, and remained in command through the rest of the campaign.

The offensive moves through north-west Europe

These messages were conveyed to Canadian units before and after the breakout from the Normandy beach head and the move east into Belgium, before the crossing of the Rhine River, and at the defeat of Germany.

A souvenir of Valcartier

The first contingent of the Canadian Expeditionary Force came together at Valcartier, Quebec, in September 1914 - and enterprising entrepreneurs were quick to produce souvenirs to sell to a willing public.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered minor changes to regulations regarding pay, rations, depot battalions, medical services, and other organizational issues.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered military funerals, the Military Police, the Canadian Ordnance Corps, and decorations and medals.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered financial instructions and allowances, the Reserve of Officers, the Fort Garry Horse, and the disbanding of certain CEF battalions.

The war according to Borden

This pamphlet collected some of Prime Minister Borden's statements on conscription, the Union Government, and what Canada must do to win the war.

Henri Bourassa and the war

His opponents twice prevented newspaper editor Henri Bourassa from giving this speech, in which he argued that the duty of Canadians was to stay clear of involvement in the First World War, so he elected to publish it as a booklet instead.

Duty of Canada.pdf (20.45 MB)