Fighting

Calling Francophones

Selling the First World War to French Canada was a challenge but this booklet, published as a recruiting tool, attempted to make the case in favour of participation.

Christmas Update

A Christmas newpaper to keep the troops stationed in Aldershot, Nova Scotia informed about the events going on around the base.

Conscription comes to Canada, 1917

This handbill, intended to be widely distributed and posted in public buildings, provided instructions for unmarried men between the ages of 20 and 34 to report for service or lodge a claim for exemption.

To the voters of New Brunswick

The New Brunswick provincial election of 20 November 1939 saw Alison Dysart's Liberals returned to power, after the premier pledged in a letter to voters to stay the course as the country went to war.

Another day at Ipperwash

Part II Orders dealt with personnel matters - appointments, hospitalizations, leaves, absences, courts martial, and any other change in status involving an individual in camp.

View PDF: A29 CITC.pdf

The Battle of Britain

The air battle over Britain in the summer of 1940 generated enormous public interest in Canada - in part because of skillful propaganda produced by Britain's Air Ministry.

Militia Orders 1917

Promulgated in Ottawa, the Militia Orders covered a wide range of subjects, including appointments and postings, stores and clothing, certificates gained by militia officers, administrative staffs, and cadet services.

Militia Orders 1914

Promulgated in Ottawa, the Militia Orders covered a wide range of subjects, including appointments and postings, stores and clothing, certificates gained by militia officers, administrative staffs, and cadet services.

National registration comes to Canada

According to the 1940 legislation, everyone over the age of 16 was compelled to register with the federal government, giving their personal information and employment history, to provide an inventory of the available skills that might be mobilized for the war effort.

Officer-like Qualities

The object of this manual was to give the inexperienced Temporary Officer a sense of the qualities - knowledge, loyalty, firmness, fairness - at which he should aim.

View PDF: OLQ.pdf

The application of infantry fire-power

This mid-Second World War manual reminded soldiers of the requirements for effective infantry fire, including accuracy, fire discipline, and the ability to judge distance.

Dad's Army in Canada

In 1939, men who were too old for combatant service could enlist in one of a number of auxiliary formations, such as the Volunteer Civil Guard, which performed ceremonial and security duties in Thorold, Ontario, when necessary.

View PDF: Thorold VCG.pdf

Lost in the mail

Everything had to be accounted for in wartime - even chamois vests bought by Canadian soldiers that were lost in transit.

News for the Canadian forces overseas

Distributed free to Canadians in uniform, this digest included snippets of news from across the country, with a healthy dose of sports.

A camera at the front

One of the many publications of Lord Beaverbrook's Canadian War Records Office, this magazine featured the work of Canada's official photographers, and was billed as both propaganda and history.

"'Foreign' Canadians in the Present War"

This general-interest magazine, created by Polish-Canadian journalists in Toronto, was directed at Canadians whose ethnic heritage was neither English nor French.

The Allies at war

Published in England, this magazine highlighted the breadth of the Allied war effort, and particularly the wealth in natural resources of the British Empire, for French-speaking readers.

Constructing barbed wire defences

This manual, used for training purposes by the 215th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, was based on two years' worth of hard experience in defending captured positions.

Voting in Ontario

Wartime elections meant a new class of voters: those in uniform. In Ontario, the franchise was extended to men who were not normally allowed to vote, including those under the age of twenty-one and members of the First Nations, provided they were serving in the military.

Hockey dominates the news pages

The newspaper of HMCS York, billed as "Canada's No. 1 Navy Weekly", was dominated by sports news, with war bulletins and political news items thrown in for good measure.

View PDF: Yorker.pdf

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