Relaxing

To my Dear Family

Pte. Albert James Tufford was conscripted into the Canadian army early in 1918; by March, he was on his way overseas. Through the eleven months that he was in Europe, he sent dozens of postcards home to his family in the Niagara Falls region (his mother and younger sister) and the United States (his grandmother). In September 1918, he was sent to France; less than a month later, he was shot in the left arm and brought back to England. Tufford spent most of his eleven months at Witley Camp in Surrey, but traveled while on leave to Scotland, Ireland, and Wales. His correspondence with his family was very relaxed. He wrote a lot about the beauty of the places he visited and touched on the training he received. A few of the postcards went into detail about the wound he received in France and his medical treatment in England.

Patriotism on show

This printed fabric calendar, with a typical patriotic motif and slogan, was displayed in a house in New Brunswick - at least until September 1917.

Field Day

A program for a Field Day held "somewhere in France", containing competitors and events, held on the 30th of June 1917.

Making use of available materials

A letter home to Canada written on birch bark.

View PDF: Birch Letter.pdf

Musical Propaganda

A pamphlet sold on the home front for 25 cents with sheet music and lyrics for the song "Hitler on the Run!" by Neil MacDonald.

The war in Africa

This kind of exhibition was important in raising awareness of, and support for, military campaigns that drew little attention.

Souvenir of an overseas voyage

Early in the war, soldiers going overseas might be given a souvenir like this. As the war dragged on and sailings became increasingly more frequent, they disappeared from the scene.

The grandest war song ever written

The fortunes of Britain's war effort were low when this song was published in 1941, and they would get lower the following year - no matter how proud the world was of England.

"They fly, they sing, as they rise on the wing"

This song probably reached Canadian stores during the Battle of Britain in 1940, when the defence of the British Isles from German bombing attacks fell to fighter pilots from Britain and the Empire.

V for Victory

"Dot dot dot dash" became one of the most recognizable identifiers of the Allied war effort, and could be found on countless kinds of consumer goods - including sheet music.

From a mother to her son

In its sentiment and language, this sheet music could easily have come from the First World War - only the faint image of the tank on the cover places it in the Second World War.

Dedicated to fellow stretcher-bearers

Albert Drummond was a nurse in Halifax, Nova Scotia, when he joined the Canadian Army Medical Corps in December 1916. He eventually served overseas with the 15th Canadian Field Ambulance. Judging by the titles of the poems, this volume was probably published in 1917.

"Hitler - you'll feel much littler"

This song version of the famous military march "Colonel Bogey" was recorded by the Happy Gang, one of the most popular entertainment acts in Second World War Canada.

View PDF: Good Luck.pdf

"We're off to finish Hitler"

Although it was probably written in 1939, this song, with its professed joy at the coming of war, sounds more like 1914.

View PDF: For Freedom.pdf

From Ypres to victory

These souvenirs cards, with original art by Lewis E. Smith, were produced in 1919 to mark significant events of the First World War, using the poems they inspired.

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons

By May 1916, Regina's Wascana Lodge had already seen twenty-six of its members enlist for active service.

View PDF: Wascana Lodge.pdf

"Poems tragic, poems nostalgic"

The Second World War was a less poetic war than the First had been, but there were enough amateur poets in the Canadian army in Italy to fill this collection of poems, all of which had originally been published in the military newspaper "The Maple Leaf."

View PDF: Rhyme & Reason.pdf

Music of the Cape Breton Highlanders

This collection of specialty pieces and old favourites includes songs in two languages - English and Gaelic.

Singing on the road to war

This songbook, donated to soldiers by a Hamilton, Ontario, businessman, including selections ranging from "Eternal Father, Strong to Save" to "Stop Yer Tickling, Jock."

Music of the New World

Broadcast on the CBC from 17 August to 5 October 1944, this weekly program highlighted the work of Canadian composers such as Healey Willan, J.J. Weinzweig, J.J. Gagnier, and Alexander Brott.

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