Remembering

"They gave their own lives"

Although this service was held after the Second World War, its content and symbols were redolent of the First.

A Vimy pilgrim's travel arrangements

Ross McIntyre of Komoka, Ontario, served in the Black Watch rather than in the Canadian Corps - but he still made the trip to France in 1936 for the unveiling of the Vimy Memorial.

The Dead of Assiniboia

The memorial, which lists 39 dead from the First World War and 15 dead from the Second, was moved and repaired in 1982. The soldier had to be removed because of damage caused by vandals.

Old Boys in Brantford

Toronto's 84th Battalion was broken up in 1916 to provide reinforcements for other units, but its members continued to meet for years after the First World War ended.

Remembering the Sacrifice

A Form of Service from the unveiling of the Cross of Sacrifice in Rothesay, New Brunswick, remembering "men of the parish who gave their lives for King and Country in the Great War".

From soldier to veteran

When he was discharged in 1919, Leon Cantelon of Wingham, Ontario, almost immediately joined what was then Canada's largest ex-soldiers' group, the Great War Veterans' Association.

Six Bits

The 75th Battalion drew from the Toronto area, and its association newspaper celebrated its war exploits and the postwar achievements of its members.

View PDF: Six Bits.pdf

"Overseas in 1914"

This reunion was organized by the Originals Club, founded in 1918 to bring together men who had gone overseas with the original 1st Division. There is an unmistakeable note of nostalgia in its description of the war years and the legacies of service.

The Canadian Corps in Port Colborne

The Canadian Corps Association was founded after the Corps reunion in Toronto in 1934, and a few branches still exist in Canada, the membership rolls bolstered by descendants of originals of the Canadian Corps and veterans of later wars.

Entertainment, dancing and bridge

The Great War Veterans Association was the largest of Canada's ex-soldier groups that decided to remain independent when most others amalgamated into the Canadian Legion in 1926.

Bell's Bulldogs

This Calgary battalion took its nickname from its very popular first commanding officer. Among those listed in this directory is Prime Minister R.B. Bennett, an associate member of the organization.

View PDF: 31st Bn 1933.pdf

A voice for veterans

The Army and Navy Veterans in Canada was one of the few such organizations that decided to remain independent when the Canadian Legion was formed in 1926.

The Heroic Dead

The Hants County, Nova Scotia, war memorial drew its inspiration from British history, from the creators of Stonehenge to the builders of the British Empire.

The Emma Gees

Every November, former machine gunners in British Columbia assembled to remember fallen comrades and enjoy an evening together. On this evening, they were all too aware that another generation of Canadians had been forced to go to war.

The good old 18th

In 1919, the members of London's Women's Canadian Club held a dinner for the returning 18th Battalion, just as they had done when the unit left London in 1914. Among the celebrities on hand were Sir Adam Beck and Hume Cronyn, MP.

Missing at Regina Trench

Frank Elvin of Guelph, Ontario, was not yet twenty years old when he went missing in action in the last stages of the Battle of the Somme in October 1916. The date on the card likely refers to the date that official notification reached his family.

View PDF: Elvin card.pdf

Machine gunners in Winnipeg

In this amusing souvenir program, officer of the Canadian Machine Gun Corps used their wartime experiences as a source of humour.

The democracy of death

Established in 1922, the Regina Soldiers Cemetery held the remains of over 300 men and women - guarded by two German field guns captured in battle.

Returning to Vimy Ridge

This bilingual booklet was available for battlefield tourists four years before the Vimy Memorial was unveiled, and remained in distribution until invading Nazi armies in 1940 confiscated the remaining stock of copies.

View PDF: Vimy.pdf

A community honours its dead

When the Pugwash war memorial was unveiled in 1922, the souvenir booklet listed not only the area's dead, but those people who had donated to the memorial fund, as well the amounts.

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