Advertisements

Army jeep Winnipeg insurance premium reminder

Pay your premium!

This Winnipeg insurance company used an image of an army jeep to remind people to pay their premiums.

Advertising with the Admiral

Admiral Percy Nelles was Canada's Chief of Naval Staff during the Second World War - but one wonders if he gave his permission for his image to be used on this advertisement from a New Brunswick dry goods store.

The war so far ...

Smart-Woods was one of Canada's biggest manufacturers of bags, cloth, canvas, and clothing, but its products were barely mentioned in this advertising magazine, which offered a statistical compendium of the nations involved in the First World War.

View PDF: Sacklopedia.pdf

Useful gifts for soldier boys

It was up to Canadians at home to remember their loved ones overseas with the odd gift - bought, of course, from a local retailer.

Made in Canada

This multilingual decal was made in 1943, likely to affix to Canadian war materiel, perhaps vehicles, being exported.

Buy Canadian!

During the Second World War, the federal government aggressively promoted a "buy Canadian" strategy, to prevent an outflow of currency to pay for foreign-made goods.

The war so far ...

Because so much of the fighting took place in regions that were unfamiliar to Canadians, war maps were enormously popular, for they simplified complicated events and allowed civilians to make sense of news coming from the war fronts.

The war from all sides

British press baron Lord Northcliffe published this contemporary history of the Great War, with proceeds going to the British Red Cross Society and the Order of St John.

Go To It!

This Second World War advertising premium invoked British cabinet minister Herbert Morrison in urging Canadians to buy War Savings Certificates.

Window shopping in wartime

These photographs, possibly taken in Vancouver, show a store window given over to advertising in support of War Savings Stamps.

Selling insurance with the flag

Using a verse by poet Frederick George Scott, an insurance company played on First World War patriotism as an advertising strategy.

Being a careful shopper

This modest pamphlet, published in Saint John, New Brunswick, was one of many that combined advertising with tips for women on how to cope with wartime shortages.

View PDF: Homemaker.pdf

A wartime sales pitch

To capitalize on public sentiment, Dodds-Simpson Press offered specially inscribed bound volumes of a popular illustrated magazine to the families of Canadians in uniform - the addresses having been supplied by the federal government.

View PDF: War Pictorial.pdf

The Ghosts of Vimy Ridge

Longstaff's painting was hugely popular and widely reproduced, but was anyone offended when a funeral home distributed copies it for advertising purposes?

Poppy seeds for remembrance

John McCrae's poem "In Flanders Fields" was among the most widely reproduced Canadian poems of the twentieth century. A lack of copyright protection meant that it could be freely used for almost any purpose, as in this sheet that accompanied a packet of poppy seeds.

In Flanders Fields

John McCrae's poem "In Flanders Fields" appeared in many advertisements during and after the First World War - but was it in poor taste for it to be used by a maker of surgical dressings?

Loose lips sink ships

In this mini-poster, a Canadian seaman urges people to keep quiet - inadvertently revealing sensitive military information might lead to the sinking of his ship.

Buy Canadian

This decal, probably intended to be affixed in a store window, reminded consumers that buying Canadian goods supported local workers and helped shore up the currency at the same time.

Shopping for uniform hats

One of the unintended consequences of war was a steep rise in demand for military uniforms, hats, badges, and other paraphernalia, demand that manufacturers were happy to meet.

The walls have ears

This advertisement encouraged Canadians to be particularly careful about what they said in hotels, for it was always possible that an enemy agent might be listening.

Pages