Service Documents

Militia Orders 1917

Promulgated in Ottawa, the Militia Orders covered a wide range of subjects, including appointments and postings, stores and clothing, certificates gained by militia officers, administrative staffs, and cadet services.

Militia Orders 1914

Promulgated in Ottawa, the Militia Orders covered a wide range of subjects, including appointments and postings, stores and clothing, certificates gained by militia officers, administrative staffs, and cadet services.

Dad's Army in Canada

In 1939, men who were too old for combatant service could enlist in one of a number of auxiliary formations, such as the Volunteer Civil Guard, which performed ceremonial and security duties in Thorold, Ontario, when necessary.

View PDF: Thorold VCG.pdf

Lost in the mail

Everything had to be accounted for in wartime - even chamois vests bought by Canadian soldiers that were lost in transit.

A soldier's paybook

Harry Catling, a thirteen-year veteran of the British Army, left Canada for England as a reservist as soon as the First World War began, returned to Canada when his term of service expired in 1916, and promptly enlisted in the Canadian Army Service Corps in Toronto.

Province of Nova Scotia, Active Service Voters Act 1945

In preparation for a provincial election, Nova Scotia released these regulations to allow men and women serving in Canada's military, navy, and air forces to vote in their home districts.

Certificate of Medical Unfitness

The National Resources Mobilization Act of 1940 called up men for examination for possible military service; this New Brunswicker was found medically unfit.

A New Brunswick farmer in uniform

Caleb Harrison of Forest Hill, New Brunswick, was conscripted under the Military Service Act in July 1918. These documents gave him leave from Camp Sussex on compassionate grounds in September 1918 , and formalized his discharge in January 1919.

A symbol of service

A service chevron (to be worn on the uniform sleeve) was awarded for each year of overseas service; the certificate was intended to combat the problem of the fraudulent veteran.

An Amish Mennonite at war

In December 1941 Earlus Gascho of Kirkland Lake, Ontario, declared himself a conscientious objector on the basis of his membership in the Baden-Wilmot Congregation of the Amish Mennonite Church. This correspondence deals with his arrangements for alternative service.

View PDF: Gascho.pdf

A weekend at home

This pass allowed Fleetwood Berry of the Canadian Field Artillery to be absent from his base for a weekend - perhaps to visit his family in Meaford, Ontario.

The Royal Highlanders of Canada

During the First World War, the Canadian War Records Office planned to publish short histories of every Canadian infantry battalion. This history of Montreal's 13th Battalion, affiliated with the Black Watch, was one of the few to make it into print.

View PDF: 13th Bn.pdf

"Assigned Pay will be discontinued"

One of the few drawbacks of returning to Canada after the First World War was the end of the separation allowance and assigned pay that had been remitted to one's next of kin.

Certificate of Honour

First World War veteran Eli Spencer also served in uniform during the Second World War, and was given this certificate (along with a wallet-size version) by the city of Ottawa in recognition of his service.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered financial instructions and allowances, the Reserve of Officers, the Fort Garry Horse, and the disbanding of certain CEF battalions.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered military funerals, the Military Police, the Canadian Ordnance Corps, and decorations and medals.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered minor changes to regulations regarding pay, rations, depot battalions, medical services, and other organizational issues.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered decorations and medals for long-serving members of the Militia.

The King's Message to the RAF

After the First World War, J.C. Shackleton of Toronto, Ontario, received this certificate marking his service in the Royal Air Force (formerly the Royal Flying Corps).

Fighting the flu pandemic

During the influenza epidemic at the end of the First World War, many public health authorities deputized civilian volunteers to assist with emergency medical care. Agnes Shackleton, shown in the photograph, wore this armband and carried this identification card on her rounds in October 1918.

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