Working

From steelworker to soldier to farmer

The Soldier Settlement Board aimed to turn ex-soldiers of the First World War into farmers, something it did with only limited success. This record, kept by Joseph Morrison of Launching, Prince Edward Island, details his farming successes and failures in 1922.

Behind the scenes on butter

A collection of stamps, an envelope, a letter, and a certification card regarding the production of rationed butter.

View PDF: Butter Rations.pdf

What if I lose my job?

The Second World War brought many changes to Canada, including the advent of a program of unemployment insurance. This booklet explained what was, at the time, a revolutionary system of social welfare.

View PDF: Unemp Ins Eng.pdf

Halifax powers the war

Prevented from doing so during the Second World War because of the need for secrecy, Nova Scotia Light and Power later told its war story in a series of radio broadcasts, and then condensed the broadcasts into a fully illustrated souvenir magazine in 1946.

War Contract Scandals

This collection of War Contract Scandals, investigated by the Public Accounts Committee, was released by the Liberal party to demonstrate the government's misuse of thousands of dollars, on such wastes as horses unfit for service, overpriced drugs, poor-quality binoculars, submarines rejected as unfit by other governments, and defective Shield-Shovels. Also included are the results of investigations by the special Boot Committee.

The cost of war

With the realization that Canada would face unprecedented spending demands, greater even than those faced in the First World War, one bank provided a sober analysis of the problem of growing war debt as it looked early in the Second World War.

View PDF: BNS War Debt.pdf

Feeding the cause of righteousness

In 1918, in recognition of the importance of food to the Allied war effort, the province of Prince Edward island proclaimed the week of 22 April to be "a week of Dedication and Preparation" for the coming planting season.

What's wrong with Canada's tax policy?

This address by G.S. Thorvaldson contrasted wartime, when taxation was a "patriotic duty," and peacetime, when it became "an economic and social problem." He made the case that big corporations stood to gain the most in both contexts.

View PDF: ITPA.pdf

The printing business in wartime

This souvenir publication by a Winnipeg printing and lithographing business honoured employees who had volunteered for military service and detailed the company's wartime work.

Helping out on the farm

With so many labourers in uniform during the Second World War, Ontario's farmers desperately needed workers to help bring in the harvest - hence this appeal to "store keepers, professional men, retired folk, industrial workers, housewives and young men at home."

View PDF: Farm Commando.pdf

Strategic minerals

The workers of HBM&S processed zinc, copper, and cadmium, and their company magazine not only kept them current on news around the company, but also reminded them that their work was essential to the war effort.

Daniel McDonald, enemy alien?

During the First World War, the property of enemy aliens might be subject to seizure by the federal government - a possibility that generated extra work for the courts and the legal profession.

Out of work

The Second World War brought full employment to Canada, but it also brought the Unemployment Insurance Act. This card indicated that Ethel Cooper had received an unemployment insurance book when she stopped working at a Toronto-area munitions factory.

Wartime cutbacks

During the Second World War, the demands of the wartime economy meant that non-essential tasks - like the issuance of certain financial statements - had to be curtailed.

War industries in Manitoba

This government publication featured success stories of Manitoba manufacturing, including Winnipeg's MacDonald Brothers Aircraft Limited, which assembled Avro Anson twin-engined aircraft to be used in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

View PDF: MB Indl Topics.pdf

Telephones at war

This bi-monthly magazine included features on air raid precautions in telephone exchanges, operators training in rifle skills, employees in uniform, and fund-raising and charitable activities.

Profiteers and frauds

To embarrass the Conservative government, the Liberal Party released this pamphlet alleging profiteering, kickbacks, and fraud in the manufacture and supply of munitions for Canada's war effort.

View PDF: Shell and Fuse.pdf

Serving the wartime economy

Charles McGrath was in charge of Canada's fuel supply during the First World War, and in this speech he discussed various ways in which Canadians could serve the war economy.

Manitoba Calling

The monthly magazine of Manitoba's government-run radio network was always full of wartime material: letters from staff members on active service, stories of fund-raising efforts, features on the BBC's reportage from the front, the work of the Canadian Red Cross and other voluntary organizations, and human interest stories covering different aspects of the war effort.

Canadian Federal Finance

This booklet, in many ways a response to an earlier work published by O.D. Skelton under the same name, examines war finance within the broader period of 1913 to 1926, to provide a "correct" perspective on postwar finance.

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