Veterans Programs

Help an old soldier

To make ends meet, ex-soldiers (and probably con artists impersonating ex-soldiers) sold postcards, booklets, trinkets - and calendars.

Proof of veteran status

The War Service Badge, and this certificate, which verified that the holder had the right to wear it, was intended to combat the problem of the fake veteran after the First World War. Henry Whyte of St George, Ontario, served with the 19th Battalion.

Payments from a soldier-settler

British immigrant Percy Thomas enlisted in Toronto in 1916 and, after he was demobilized, received land from the government's Soldier Settlement Board. Receipts show him repaying the debt into the early 1930s.

Getting them back to work

The First World War left in its wake an unprecedented number of disabled ex-soldiers, and the Canadian government struggled to provide meaningful job training for them. Later renamed the Invalided Soldiers Commission, the Vocational Branch published a circular with book reviews, reports on training initiatives in different cities, and lists of jobs that might be suitable for a retrained veteran.

A tailor looks for work

To assist ex-soldiers in finding work, the federal government provided introduction cards to be given to prospective employers. Henry Royle of Vancouver was interested in resuming his prewar trade: tailoring.

To all who served

Part of the Veterans Charter that emerged from the Second World War was low-cost life insurance for veterans and their families - as explained in this short booklet.

View PDF: What's Ahead.pdf

Returned Soldier's Handbook

This booklet told soldiers what to expect as they returned home to Canada, including what travel arrangements and services were available to veterans.

To Civvy Street: The Common-Sense of Re-Establishment

Canada's Re-Establishment Program offered many programs to help returning soldiers reintegrate into civilian life, through grants, vocational training, education, and help starting a new job.

Vocational Training on Civvy Street

The Canadian government provided grants, training classes, and apprenticeships to help returning soldiers get a job in civilian life. Pamphlets like this one told veterans of all of the opportunities available.

Homeward Bound

This pamphlet tells soldiers what they need to know to get back home from overseas, now that the war is over.

View PDF: Homeward Bound.pdf

Dismiss, but what of a job?

This booklet describes the governmental services available to soldiers once they return home, including training programs, social services, and tips on how to find employment.

Canada's Merchant Seamen

This booklet describes the contributions of Canada's Merchant Seamen to Canada's war effort, and describes the compensation they received from the government for their service.

A Home on Civvy Street

A 1945 guide to postwar employment, buying a home, and other aspects of reintegration into civilian society for returned servicemen.

The War Service Gratuity, 1945

The war gratuity, paid to servicemen and women upon discharge, was based on length of service at home and overseas. On this worksheet, a Prince Edward Island soldier calculated his gratuity as $668.30, just over $9100 in current values.

Finding work for ex-soldiers

At the end of the First World War, the Canadian government faced an unprecedented problem with the return of tens of thousands of ex-soldiers who would be looking for work. It relied on local officials for appraisals of the job market in various areas.

Standardized houses for soldier-settlers

This pamphlet provided plans for four standardized houses, each of which cost under $800 and could be built within eight days. In drawing up the plans, the Soldier Settlement Board's architect consulted "a number of leading Pioneer Women in the West."

View PDF: Housing Plans.pdf

Preparing for the "Cease Fire"

In 1940, the Canadian Legion War Services launched a fund-raising drive to support the educational and social work it was doing with men in uniform, to help prepare them for the day when they would return to civilian jobs.

View PDF: Help Plan.pdf

Veterans in need

The Soldiers' Aid Commission of Ontario, like similar groups established in other provinces during the First World War, was established to provide vocational, financial, and medical assistance to ex-soldiers and their families. Barrie native John McCreight never returned this registration card, so presumably at the time he was not in need of assistance.

"Our pride in the past, our hope for the future"

Despite its title, this book was all about government programs available to Canadians after they stopped being soldiers and returned to the peacetime economy.

Legitimate veterans

Because of problem of unscrupulous individuals claiming veteran status, anyone wearing a War Service Badge after the Second World War also had to carry proof that they were entitled to wear it.

Pages