Volunteering

Saving for the war

Carrying interest rates of between 5% and 5.5%, Canada's Victory Loans represented a sound investment, and an excellent opportunity to show patriotism by supporting the war effort.

The war at a glance

This fund-raising map brochure, likely from 1942, offered a compendium of useful information on the nations at war, their weapons, and the territory that was being contested.

Recycling rubber

By 1943, Japan controlled up to three-quarters of the world's supply of crude rubber - making recycling essential if the Allied war effort was to continue.

View PDF: Scrap rubber.pdf

Dr Scrimger, VC

This war savings stamp honoured Captain Francis Scrimger of Montreal, who won the Victoria Cross at the Second Battle of Ypres in April 1915.

Helping the youngest war victims

One of the deadliest legacies of the First World War was disease - not just the Spanish flu, but typhus, smallpox, and consumption. As this fund-raising pamphlet argued, children in Eastern Europe were especially vulnerable.

Victory Bonds on sale!

Like previous campaign, the 1918 Victory Loan drive relied on thousands of local volunteers, both as organizers and canvassers.

Fund-raising in the Maritimes

Over a single week in 1918, the Canadian Red Cross Society intended to raise $250,000 in Nova Scotia alone - the equivalent of over $3.4 million in 2014 values.

Canadian Red Cross in War and Peace

This booklet describes the services offered by the Canadian Red Cross in the past, during the war, and in the peacetime to come.

Canadian Red Cross Speakers' Manual for the National Campaign

This booklet has instructions for speakers from the Canadian Red Cross Society, to help them meet their $5,000,000 goal in the 1940 national campaign. It includes information about how the Red Cross will use your donations, and sample speeches used encourage people to donate.

A lifelong Red Cross worker

The First World War offered endless opportunity for charitable organizations, and there were many committed volunteers, like Mrs Pardee, prepared to devote time and energy to the cause.

"Europe's Triangle of Suffering"

The First World War was followed by a humanitarian crisis in eastern Europe, with destitute war orphans and the spread of typhus creating significant challenges for aid societies.

On leave in Paris

One of the many services provided by the YMCA was accommodation for soldiers on leave. This pamphlet was carried by a member of the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

View PDF: Hotel d-Ilena.pdf

From ambulances to invalid kitchens

The Canadian Red Cross Society furnished these statistics about the activities of its sister society in Britain - which was spending $30 every minute on relief and charitable work related to the war.

Knitting for Victory

This craft book included a long list of women's war charities in Canada, and patterns for every conceivable garment for men and women in uniform, as well as "practical styles for war victims."

View PDF: Monarch.pdf

"Pull Together, Canada"

Canada's second Victory Loan campaign ran in 1941 and to generate public interest, the Ontario Public Relations Committee mounted a splashy stage show, complete with its own theme song.

Having a fund-raiser?

During the Second World War, the federal government took control of all fund-raising activities and the organizers of any event were required to secure the appropriate permission from the Department of National War Services.

Giving the gift of life

Donating blood was even more important in wartime than peacetime, because of the need for "emergency transfusions to those of His Majesty's Forces or civilians who are war casualties."

A Victory Loan donor

The Second World War ended in August 1945, but the 9th Victory Loan continued to attract support from Canadians in October and November.

Twenty blood donations

During the Second World War, giving blood was a patriotic act, and twenty donations earned Mark Laversohn a special certificate.

The need for blood

Thanks to advances in blood transfusion practice and technology during the First World War, blood could be stored and shipped more safely during the Second World War - and therefore there was a greater need for blood donors.

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