Shopping

Being a careful shopper

This modest pamphlet, published in Saint John, New Brunswick, was one of many that combined advertising with tips for women on how to cope with wartime shortages.

View PDF: Homemaker.pdf

A wartime sales pitch

To capitalize on public sentiment, Dodds-Simpson Press offered specially inscribed bound volumes of a popular illustrated magazine to the families of Canadians in uniform - the addresses having been supplied by the federal government.

View PDF: War Pictorial.pdf

The Ghosts of Vimy Ridge

Longstaff's painting was hugely popular and widely reproduced, but was anyone offended when a funeral home distributed copies it for advertising purposes?

Driving in wartime

The federal government placed strict limits on the purchase of gasoline during the Second World War, but extra fuel could be made available under special circumstances.

Rides for soldiers

Hitch-hiking was very common in the 1940s and this sign, placed on the car's dashboard or glued to a window, indicated that the driver was happy to give a ride to anyone in uniform.

Poppy seeds for remembrance

John McCrae's poem "In Flanders Fields" was among the most widely reproduced Canadian poems of the twentieth century. A lack of copyright protection meant that it could be freely used for almost any purpose, as in this sheet that accompanied a packet of poppy seeds.

In Flanders Fields

John McCrae's poem "In Flanders Fields" appeared in many advertisements during and after the First World War - but was it in poor taste for it to be used by a maker of surgical dressings?

Loose lips sink ships

In this mini-poster, a Canadian seaman urges people to keep quiet - inadvertently revealing sensitive military information might lead to the sinking of his ship.

Buy Canadian

This decal, probably intended to be affixed in a store window, reminded consumers that buying Canadian goods supported local workers and helped shore up the currency at the same time.

Driving in a blackout

To achieve an effective blackout, the BC government issued this pamphlet to instruct drivers on modifying their cars, motorcycles, and bicycles by masking the headlights.

View PDF: Traffic.pdf

Shopping for uniform hats

One of the unintended consequences of war was a steep rise in demand for military uniforms, hats, badges, and other paraphernalia, demand that manufacturers were happy to meet.

Keeping an eye on prices

To combat inflation during the Second World War, the federal government imposed controls on wages and prices. These booklets were distributed widely to women so they could keep track of prices while shopping; stores that appeared to be charging above the price ceiling were to be reported to one of thirteen Women's Regional Advisory Committees for investigation.

Controlling the Cost of Living

This speech by Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King in October 1941 addresses the increased cost of living during wartime, including potential causes and a plan for stabilization.

View PDF: Cost of Living

The walls have ears

This advertisement encouraged Canadians to be particularly careful about what they said in hotels, for it was always possible that an enemy agent might be listening.

Rumour - Kill It!

This advertisement, which was produced in many different formats during the Second World War, urged Canadians to take a hard line against rumour-mongering.

Fighting inflation

This pamphlet, the second in a series, emphasizes price-consciousness through an overview of Canada's price control policy and its effectiveness on combating inflation.

View PDF: Fighting Inflation

Everything is Expensive ... Why?

By 1917, Canadians were experiencing a steep rise in the cost of living. A number of Canadians called for the Borden government to implement a system of wartime price-fixing to alleviate the strain of inflation. While systems of food and fuel control would be adopted in mid-1917, formal price-fixing was never adopted. This booklet contemplates the issue and questions why Canadians should be subject to such inflation during wartime.

View PDF: Tout est Cher

The war in 1942 - from Maple Leaf Anti-Freeze

This folder, distributed by the company's Montreal headquarters, combined an advertisement for anti-freeze, consumer tips, advice on helping the war effort, and an informative war map.

A soldier's guide to Rome

Prepared by the Canadian community in Rome, this guide was intended to ensure that Canadian servicemen and women on leave in the Eternal City saw all the important tourist sites.

View PDF: Rome in a Day.pdf

Buying alcohol in Quebec

Quebec regulations allowed adults over the age of twenty to purchase up to forty ounces of alcohol each fortnight; coupons became void once the date on them passed.

View PDF: QC permit.pdf

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