Fighting

Brief Notes on War Gases and Spray

This pamphlet instructs soldiers on the various war gases they may encounter, how to recognize them, and how to protect yourself against them.

Basic and Battle Physical Training Part IX: Boxing and Wrestling

This book, part of a series of training pamphlets that replaced the 1942 Physical Training series, describes the basics of boxing and wrestling and their military uses.

Army Physical Drill Made Easy

This training manual describes everything an officer needs to know about leading his men through physical training, including diagrams of the proper positions for exercises and simplified language to make sure everyone can understand.

Infantry Training Part VI: The Anti-Tank Platoon 1943

The UK War Office produced and issued a series of short training manuals used by both the British and Canadian armies. Collectively, these manuals established the doctrine, or tactical procedures, for both armies throughout the war. This 1943 manual concerns the operation of the anti-tank platoon.

Attack and Defence: Unarmed Combat in Pictures

Ever wonder how to fight an armed Nazi with your bare hands? Look no further. Mixed Martial Arts, 1940s style!

Exempted from conscription

Men who had been given exemptions under the Military Service Act were required to complete this questionnaire to justify their claim. It pays particular attention to men employed in the agricultural sector.

Conscription comes to Canada

Conscription came to Canada in 1917 amidst great controversy. This leaflet was part of the government's effort to explain why it was necessary and how it would work.

View PDF: MSA.pdf

Certificate of Medical Unfitness

The National Resources Mobilization Act of 1940 called up men for examination for possible military service; this New Brunswicker was found medically unfit.

A New Brunswick farmer in uniform

Caleb Harrison of Forest Hill, New Brunswick, was conscripted under the Military Service Act in July 1918. These documents gave him leave from Camp Sussex on compassionate grounds in September 1918 , and formalized his discharge in January 1919.

A send-off for lodge members

When men of the King William Lodge joined the 105th Regiment, their fellow lodge members gave them each a pocket bible and their best wishes for a safe return at war's end.

"Efficient first aid may be a life-saving knowledge"

Compiled in 1942, this manual covered everything from splinting a broken limb to recognizing and dealing with gas attacks.

View PDF: First Aid RCN.pdf

Training airmen in BC

Patricia Bay was the wartime home of the Royal Air Force's 32 Operational Training Unit, which trained airmen from Britain, Australia, and New Zealand, an RCAF training unit, and a seaplane base. "The Patrician" was the publication of the RAF community.

View PDF: Patrician.pdf

Welcome to Carberry

During the Second World War, Carberry, Manitoba, hosted a Service Flying Training School of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. This book was published to introduce incoming students to the town and its people, and to recognize their contribution to the Allied war effort.

Calisthenics for new recruits

For many new soldiers, the introduction to army life included healthy doses of bending, stretching, and other exercises laid out in this First World War manual.

View PDF: PT tables.pdf

A law-abiding man

Many young men attempted to evade conscription during the First World War, so the military authorities provided certificates to men who had observed the law and properly registered with the government, as proof against harassment by the police of potential employers.

An eyewitness in at the front

Novelist Arnold Bennett was the first major writer to be invited to tour the Western Front during the First World War; his account was published in late 1915. This postcard invited book-buyers to experience "all the picturesque, moving figures of the front."

A symbol of service

A service chevron (to be worn on the uniform sleeve) was awarded for each year of overseas service; the certificate was intended to combat the problem of the fraudulent veteran.

An Amish Mennonite at war

In December 1941 Earlus Gascho of Kirkland Lake, Ontario, declared himself a conscientious objector on the basis of his membership in the Baden-Wilmot Congregation of the Amish Mennonite Church. This correspondence deals with his arrangements for alternative service.

View PDF: Gascho.pdf

Using the Ross Rifle

The Ross Rifle was superb for target shooting, but left much to be desired in combat conditions - as the Canadian 1st Division learned to its peril at Ypres in April 1915.

View PDF: Ross Rifle.pdf

Inside an artillery battery

Like most First World War unit publications, this magazine combined cartoons, jokes, amusing stories, and battery news. A regular feature was "Things We Would Like to Know", which included the question "Why is it we're always on the move? Can't we pay the rent?"

View PDF: OPip Xmas.pdf

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