Fighting

"Efficient first aid may be a life-saving knowledge"

Compiled in 1942, this manual covered everything from splinting a broken limb to recognizing and dealing with gas attacks.

View PDF: First Aid RCN.pdf

Training airmen in BC

Patricia Bay was the wartime home of the Royal Air Force's 32 Operational Training Unit, which trained airmen from Britain, Australia, and New Zealand, an RCAF training unit, and a seaplane base. "The Patrician" was the publication of the RAF community.

View PDF: Patrician.pdf

Welcome to Carberry

During the Second World War, Carberry, Manitoba, hosted a Service Flying Training School of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. This book was published to introduce incoming students to the town and its people, and to recognize their contribution to the Allied war effort.

Calisthenics for new recruits

For many new soldiers, the introduction to army life included healthy doses of bending, stretching, and other exercises laid out in this First World War manual.

View PDF: PT tables.pdf

A law-abiding man

Many young men attempted to evade conscription during the First World War, so the military authorities provided certificates to men who had observed the law and properly registered with the government, as proof against harassment by the police of potential employers.

An eyewitness in at the front

Novelist Arnold Bennett was the first major writer to be invited to tour the Western Front during the First World War; his account was published in late 1915. This postcard invited book-buyers to experience "all the picturesque, moving figures of the front."

A symbol of service

A service chevron (to be worn on the uniform sleeve) was awarded for each year of overseas service; the certificate was intended to combat the problem of the fraudulent veteran.

An Amish Mennonite at war

In December 1941 Earlus Gascho of Kirkland Lake, Ontario, declared himself a conscientious objector on the basis of his membership in the Baden-Wilmot Congregation of the Amish Mennonite Church. This correspondence deals with his arrangements for alternative service.

View PDF: Gascho.pdf

Using the Ross Rifle

The Ross Rifle was superb for target shooting, but left much to be desired in combat conditions - as the Canadian 1st Division learned to its peril at Ypres in April 1915.

View PDF: Ross Rifle.pdf

Inside an artillery battery

Like most First World War unit publications, this magazine combined cartoons, jokes, amusing stories, and battery news. A regular feature was "Things We Would Like to Know", which included the question "Why is it we're always on the move? Can't we pay the rent?"

View PDF: OPip Xmas.pdf

Preparing for war

Issued at the beginning of the Second World War, this British manual (reprinted for Canada) covered only the most basic elements of training for war, including a series of games that could provide instruction in field-craft.

View PDF: ATM 24 War.pdf

A weekend at home

This pass allowed Fleetwood Berry of the Canadian Field Artillery to be absent from his base for a weekend - perhaps to visit his family in Meaford, Ontario.

The Royal Highlanders of Canada

During the First World War, the Canadian War Records Office planned to publish short histories of every Canadian infantry battalion. This history of Montreal's 13th Battalion, affiliated with the Black Watch, was one of the few to make it into print.

View PDF: 13th Bn.pdf

Calisthenics for soldiers

The Second World War revealed an unexpectedly low level of physical fitness in Canadian men, leading military authorities to devote considerable effort to remedial action. Training brochures like this one were among the results of that effort.

View PDF: PT Tables.pdf

Unfit for service

During the First World War, young men were often pressured to enlist - and were grateful to have a certificate like this one, which proved that Thomas Robson had been willing to serve but had been rejected by the army.

Today's news - 1 March 1918

During the First World War, news reached Canadian newspapers through wire services. This bulletin contained British and French official reports, and information gleaned from German sources.

Notes on Military Law

First World War veteran and later cabinet minister Brooke Claxton originally prepared these notes in the form of lectures for the McGill University Contingent of the Canadian Officers' Training Corps. They cover everything from courts martial to morale and efficiency.

Grenades in trench warfare

One lesson of trench warfare was that "bombing" (or using hand grenades) was much more important in capturing and clearing enemy trenches than had been imagined before the war. As a result, training manuals like this one by James Ferris, who joined the 63rd Battalion in Edmonton in July 1915, were published as a way to pass on new tactical knowledge.

News from around the war

An Edmonton radio station compiled this almanac of events of the Second World War, beginning with British leaders attending talks in Rome on 11 January 1939 and ending with changes to the butter ration on 14 December 1946.

View PDF: CJCA War Diary.pdf

News for signallers

Printed after the end of the Second World War in Europe, this issue covered demobilization policy, sports news, entertainment, and an exhortation to vote in the 1945 federal election.

View PDF: Link.pdf

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