Fighting

Illustrated War News, March 1, 1916

The Illustrated War News was a weekly British magazine produced during the First World War. Each issue contains photographs, drawings, articles, and maps portraying the allied war effort, for readers in the United Kingdom, Canada, and Newfoundland.

Illustrated War News, April 26, 1916

The Illustrated War News was a weekly British magazine produced during the First World War. Each issue contains photographs, drawings, articles, and maps portraying the allied war effort, for readers in the United Kingdom, Canada, and Newfoundland.

Illustrated War News, April 19, 1916

The Illustrated War News was a weekly British magazine produced during the First World War. Each issue contains photographs, drawings, articles, and maps portraying the allied war effort, for readers in the United Kingdom, Canada, and Newfoundland.

Illustrated War News, April 5, 1916

The Illustrated War News was a weekly British magazine produced during the First World War. Each issue contains photographs, drawings, articles, and maps portraying the allied war effort, for readers in the United Kingdom, Canada, and Newfoundland.

Canada's Part in the Great War

This booklet provides a brief overview of Canada's contribution to the First World War, written shortly after the end of the war. Learn about Canada's military operations, naval service, changes in government finances, war production and trade, home-front rationing, and services for returned soldiers.

Army Physical Drill Made Easy

This training manual describes everything an officer needs to know about leading his men through physical training, including diagrams of the proper positions for exercises and simplified language to make sure everyone can understand.

Exempted from conscription

Men who had been given exemptions under the Military Service Act were required to complete this questionnaire to justify their claim. It pays particular attention to men employed in the agricultural sector.

Conscription comes to Canada

Conscription came to Canada in 1917 amidst great controversy. This leaflet was part of the government's effort to explain why it was necessary and how it would work.

View PDF: PDF icon MSA.pdf

A New Brunswick farmer in uniform

Caleb Harrison of Forest Hill, New Brunswick, was conscripted under the Military Service Act in July 1918. These documents gave him leave from Camp Sussex on compassionate grounds in September 1918 , and formalized his discharge in January 1919.

A send-off for lodge members

When men of the King William Lodge joined the 105th Regiment, their fellow lodge members gave them each a pocket bible and their best wishes for a safe return at war's end.

Calisthenics for new recruits

For many new soldiers, the introduction to army life included healthy doses of bending, stretching, and other exercises laid out in this First World War manual.

View PDF: PDF icon PT tables.pdf

A law-abiding man

Many young men attempted to evade conscription during the First World War, so the military authorities provided certificates to men who had observed the law and properly registered with the government, as proof against harassment by the police of potential employers.

An eyewitness in at the front

Novelist Arnold Bennett was the first major writer to be invited to tour the Western Front during the First World War; his account was published in late 1915. This postcard invited book-buyers to experience "all the picturesque, moving figures of the front."

A symbol of service

A service chevron (to be worn on the uniform sleeve) was awarded for each year of overseas service; the certificate was intended to combat the problem of the fraudulent veteran.

Using the Ross Rifle

The Ross Rifle was superb for target shooting, but left much to be desired in combat conditions - as the Canadian 1st Division learned to its peril at Ypres in April 1915.

View PDF: PDF icon Ross Rifle.pdf

Inside an artillery battery

Like most First World War unit publications, this magazine combined cartoons, jokes, amusing stories, and battery news. A regular feature was "Things We Would Like to Know", which included the question "Why is it we're always on the move? Can't we pay the rent?"

View PDF: PDF icon OPip Xmas.pdf

A weekend at home

This pass allowed Fleetwood Berry of the Canadian Field Artillery to be absent from his base for a weekend - perhaps to visit his family in Meaford, Ontario.

The Royal Highlanders of Canada

During the First World War, the Canadian War Records Office planned to publish short histories of every Canadian infantry battalion. This history of Montreal's 13th Battalion, affiliated with the Black Watch, was one of the few to make it into print.

View PDF: PDF icon 13th Bn.pdf

Unfit for service

During the First World War, young men were often pressured to enlist - and were grateful to have a certificate like this one, which proved that Thomas Robson had been willing to serve but had been rejected by the army.

Today's news - 1 March 1918

During the First World War, news reached Canadian newspapers through wire services. This bulletin contained British and French official reports, and information gleaned from German sources.

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