Service Documents

The Royal Highlanders of Canada

During the First World War, the Canadian War Records Office planned to publish short histories of every Canadian infantry battalion. This history of Montreal's 13th Battalion, affiliated with the Black Watch, was one of the few to make it into print.

13th Bn.pdf (3.5 MB)

"Assigned Pay will be discontinued"

One of the few drawbacks of returning to Canada after the First World War was the end of the separation allowance and assigned pay that had been remitted to one's next of kin.

Certificate of Honour

First World War veteran Eli Spencer also served in uniform during the Second World War, and was given this certificate (along with a wallet-size version) by the city of Ottawa in recognition of his service.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered minor changes to regulations regarding pay, rations, depot battalions, medical services, and other organizational issues.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered military funerals, the Military Police, the Canadian Ordnance Corps, and decorations and medals.

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered financial instructions and allowances, the Reserve of Officers, the Fort Garry Horse, and the disbanding of certain CEF battalions.

The King's Message to the RAF

After the First World War, J.C. Shackleton of Toronto, Ontario, received this certificate marking his service in the Royal Air Force (formerly the Royal Flying Corps).

Militia General Orders, 1917

General Orders, promulgated to Canada's Non-Permanent Active Militia by the Minister of Militia in Militia Council, addressed a range of administrative and functional matters. This one covered decorations and medals for long-serving members of the Militia.

Fighting the flu pandemic

During the influenza epidemic at the end of the First World War, many public health authorities deputized civilian volunteers to assist with emergency medical care. Agnes Shackleton, shown in the photograph, wore this armband and carried this identification card on her rounds in October 1918.

Unfit for military service

This certificate indicated that Georges Burelle of Montreal had been placed in Category E by a medical examiner - indicating that he was permanently physically unfit for military service.