Recruiting

Are you doing your bit?

This song was dedicated to Minister of Militia and Defence Sam Hughes, and suggested that Canadian men ask themselves a pointed question: "Is the bit I'm doing just the biggest bit I can?"

Do your bit.pdf (61.38 MB)

Saving the situation at Ypres

Part historical account, part recruiting pamphlet, this folder described in glowing terms the Canadian defence of Ypres, to encourage other young men to follow in the footsteps of those who had already joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

Ypres folder.pdf (2.27 MB)

Call to Arms - the French-Canadian response

This booklet analyzes the French-Canadian response to the issue of enlistment, particularly in the wake of the Military Service Act of 1917. The author focuses specifically on the different responses between French- and English-speaking Canadians.

Why I am enlisting

Presenting a speech advocating enlistment, this booklet also contains three letters on the issue written by Prime Minister Robert Borden, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, and Sir Sam Hughes.

French-Canadian volunteers

Including a speech given by Major Olivar Asselin at a dinner meeting of the Comité France-Amérique in June 1915, this booklet addresses Asselin's work in recruiting French Canadians for the war effort.

Freedom or slavery?

To encourage enlistment, this collection of cartoons from the Second World War asked the farmer, the worker, the union member, the Catholic - if they would prefer freedom or slavery.

Join the Canadian Engineers!

This card, featuring a quote from British prime minister David Lloyd George and a famous illustration from "Punch" magazine marking the 2nd Battle of Ypres, could be used to encourage enlistment in any unit. Hopkins eventually joined the 86th Battalion rather than the 1st Field Troop, Canadian Engineers.

Your country needs you!

At a time when volunteers were becoming increasingly difficult to find, recruiters in London, Ontario, tried to put the most positive gloss possible on enlistment.

Farewell to a Montreal conscript

The message to Paul St Louis, who was conscripted into the CEF in June 1918, reads, "Des salut a toute tes amis, tous les joueurs de base-ball et tous les autres [sic]."

His Country's Call

A typical patriotic image from the First World War, by British artist Cyril Cuneo.