Speeches and Broadcasts

The war so far

In this speech, the former Ottawa Member of Parliament and member of the Senate gave a brief outline of the Allied war effort over the first two years of the war.

Canada as a German colony

In this fascinating address, Clarance Warner sketched a picture of Canada's future if the British Empire lost the First World War and Canada became a German colony.

The 1917 election

Journalist and Liberal Party organizer W.T.R. Preston was a bitter critic on the Conservative government and its running of the war, best known for writing the editorial that led to Sir Arthur Currie suing a Port Hope, Ontario, newspaper for libel. In this speech, he launched a blistering attack on the government for meddling in the 1917 election.

Canadian Defence: What We Have to Defend

Interested in adult education, the Kelsey Club in collaboration with the newly formed Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, provided this series of discussions on the subject of Canadian defence. Each discussion is led by a prominent individual; contributors include J.W. Dafoe and J.S. Woodsworth.

Canada at War: Speeches Delivered by Robert Borden in Canada and the United Kingdom

This booklet contains a collection of speeches given by Prime Minister Robert L. Borden at locations in Toronto, Ottawa, and London (UK) throughout the summer of 1918.

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Canada at War: Speeches Delivered by Robert Borden before the Canadian Clubs

This booklet contains a collection of speeches given by Prime Minister Robert L. Borden before the Canadian Clubs of Toronto, Montrael, Halifax, and Winnipeg in December of 1914.

Canada at War: Speeches Delivered by Robert L. Borden in Canada and the United Kingdom

This booklet contains a collection of speeches given by Prime Minister Robert L. Borden in Montreal, London (UK) and Manchester between December, 1916 and May, 1917.

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Canada at War: Special Session of the Dominion Parliament, 1914

In this speech before a special session of the Dominion parliament in August of 1914, Prime Minister Robert Borden considers emergency measures to be adopted by the government in response to the outbreak of war in Europe.

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Robert Borden in New York

In this speech given to the Lawyers' Club of New York City in November 1916, Prime Minister Robert L. Borden discusses the relationship between Canada and the United States.

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Canada at War: Imperial Conference, 1917

Prime Minister Robert Borden gave this speech to the House of Commons, commenting on the Imperial War Conference of 1917.

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What Canada is Doing: A Tribute to the Canadian People

This speech made by Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King in the House of Commons, outlines the great contribution of the Canadian people to the war effort, particularly on the home front, and expresses gratitude to the people of the United States for their contributions.

Servitude or Freedom: The Present Position of the War

In this speech to the Canadian Club of Ottawa, Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King outlines a recent trip to Great Britain, emphasizing the Canadian contribution to the war and the respect for Canada expressed by the people of Britain.

The Lord Mayor's Luncheon in Honour of the Prime Minister of Canada

This speech, including addresses by Prime Minister's Churchill and King, discusses Canada's place at the side of Britain and her continued devotion to the Allied war effort.

The Lord Mayor's Luncheon in Honour of the Prime Minister of Canada

This speech, including addresses by Prime Minister's Churchill and King, discusses Canada's place at the side of Britain and her continued devotion to the Allied war effort.

Canada and the War - Winston Churchill

This pamphlet contains the french-language version of a speech by Winston Churchill, Prime Minister of Great Britain, presented to the Canadian Senate and House of Commons.

Let's Face the Facts - Four Addresses

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular collection of speeches contains four addresses by Dorothy Thompson, Robert E. Sherwood, James Hilton, and John W. Dafoe. Suggested additional readings are also included.

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Let's Face the Facts - William Lyon Mackenzie King

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister of Canada.

Let's Face the Facts - Robert E. Sherwood

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Robert E. Sherwood, an American playwright.

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Let's Face the Facts - Richard O. Boyer

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Richard O. Boyer, the foreign correspondent of the New York evening newspaper, "PM".

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Let's Face the Facts - Percy J. Philip

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Percy J. Philip, the Canadian Correspondent to the New York Times.

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