World War II

Let's Face the Facts - Sir Gerald Campbell

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Sir Gerald Campbell, the High Commissioner for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Let's Face the Facts - Florence Reed

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Florence Reed, an American actress.

View PDF: PDF icon Florence Reed

Let's Face the Facts - Frederick Birchall

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Frederick Birchall, a writer for the New York Times.

View PDF: PDF icon Frederick Birchall

Let's Face the Facts - Frederick Griffin

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Frederick Griffin, a Canadian newspaper journalist.

View PDF: PDF icon Frederick Griffin

Let's Face the Facts - Edwin S. Johnson

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Edwin S. Johnson, the Superintendant of the London Bureau of The Canadian Press.

View PDF: PDF icon Edwin S. Johnson

Let's Face the Facts - Dorothy Thompson

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Dorothy Thompson, an American journalist and radio broadcaster.

View PDF: PDF icon Dorothy Thompson

Let's Face the Facts - Clare Boothe

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Clare Boothe, an American magazine writer and author.

View PDF: PDF icon Clare Boothe

Let's Face the Facts - Alexander Woollcott

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This particular speech was given by Alexander Woollcott, a notable American author and critic for the New Yorker.

Let's Face The Facts - Adelard Godbout

During the war the CBC became a vital tool of the war effort, presenting a variety of wartime programming aimed at informing and motivating the Canadian public. The "Let's Face the Facts" series presented such speeches by a variety of notable Canadians commenting on different aspects of the war effort. This speech was by Adelard Godbout, Premier of Quebec (1936, 1939-1944).

View PDF: PDF icon Adelard Godbout

"The Nation and The War"

Although it was printed in 1942, this evangelical pamphlet relied heavily on the First World War in its discussion of the role of the British nation in wartime.

View PDF: PDF icon Good Tidings.pdf

The war in 1942 - from Maple Leaf Anti-Freeze

This folder, distributed by the company's Montreal headquarters, combined an advertisement for anti-freeze, consumer tips, advice on helping the war effort, and an informative war map.

Canadian War Services Fund, 1941 campaign

This letter reveals the impressive totals raised in the campaign to aid the Canadian Legion War Services, the IODE, the Knights of Columbus Canadian Army Huts, the Salvation Army Red Shield Fund, and the YMCA and YWCA War Services: over $613,000 in British Columbia, and over $7.2 million (over $106 million in 2012 values) in Canada as a whole.

The Hyde Park Declaration - Statement by William Lyon Mackenzie King

The Hyde Park Declaration of 1941 detailed an agreement between the United States and Canada to allow American-produced war materials made in Canada, for Britain, to be included in the Lend-Lease agreement. The United States, still neutral at the time, had passed legislation allowing for the production of war materials for the Allied countries, with payment to be made at a later date. The King government feared this would divert British orders in Canada to the United States, so Roosevelt and King devised the Hyde Park Declaration as a means to alleviate this concern.

The Girl of the Golden West

A Canadian soldier serving in Italy saved this theatre program as a souvenir of a leave spent in Naples, where he saw a production of Puccini's "The Girl of the Golden West" - performed with the permission of Allied military authorities.

View PDF: PDF icon Teatro.pdf

A soldier's guide to Rome

Prepared by the Canadian community in Rome, this guide was intended to ensure that Canadian servicemen and women on leave in the Eternal City saw all the important tourist sites.

View PDF: PDF icon Rome in a Day.pdf

Words of wisdom for soldiers

This collection of prayers, poems, thoughts, and messages (by people such as Winston Churchill, Robbie Burns, Walter Lippmann, and John Oxenham) was produced by the YMCA to be distributed to Canadians overseas and in uniform.

View PDF: PDF icon Everyman.pdf

Memories of a soldier son

Patrick McDermott left his home in Woodstock, Ontario, to enlist in the Canadian Army, and eventually served with the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada. He was killed in action in September 1944, and buried in Bergen-op-Zoom Canadian War Cemetery in the Netherlands. After the war, his family saved these few mementos of his time in uniform.

An infantry hero

Earl McAllister was rejected as physically unfit by the Royal Canadian Air Force, but earned fame by capturing dozens of German soldiers during the campaign in Normandy in 1944.

View PDF: PDF icon Scotty Sent Us.pdf

A Yank in the RCAF

Oklahoma native Claude Weaver joined the Royal Canadian Air Force, became an ace, was shot down in Italy, and escaped from a German prison camp.

View PDF: PDF icon Thrill Hunter.pdf

Battle in the Atlantic

This comic focused on the cooperation between Canadian airmen (in this case, the crew of a Sunderland flying boat) and British sailors of the destroyer HMS Drury in fighting the war against German U-Boats.

View PDF: PDF icon Sub busters.pdf

Pages