World War II

For bubble gum card collectors

Most children were interested in collecting the bubble gum cards, rather than in saving the packaging - which is also an interesting example of contemporary graphic art.

Be prepared for bombs

As the enemy developed new types of incendiary bombs, it was necessary to keep the public informed about new procedures - despite the fact that a fire raid on Halifax or Winnipeg was unlikely.

Pull Together, Canada

Patterned after a successful American number, this song "brings patriotism down to brass tacks and shows, in a simple and compelling way, how every Canadian can play his part."

View PDF: You Can Fight.pdf

"Where does your money go?"

The federal government used every tactic to convince Canadians to help finance the Second World War domestically - including mobilizing cartoon figures by Walt Disney.

"Guardians of our hearths"

Speaking to the women who controlled four out of every five dollars spent in Canada, Charlotte Whitton explained inflation, price controls, and the power that women could exercise to help with the war.

To the voters of New Brunswick

The New Brunswick provincial election of 20 November 1939 saw Alison Dysart's Liberals returned to power, after the premier pledged in a letter to voters to stay the course as the country went to war.

Another day at Ipperwash

Part II Orders dealt with personnel matters - appointments, hospitalizations, leaves, absences, courts martial, and any other change in status involving an individual in camp.

View PDF: A29 CITC.pdf

The Battle of Britain

The air battle over Britain in the summer of 1940 generated enormous public interest in Canada - in part because of skillful propaganda produced by Britain's Air Ministry.

The grandest war song ever written

The fortunes of Britain's war effort were low when this song was published in 1941, and they would get lower the following year - no matter how proud the world was of England.

"They fly, they sing, as they rise on the wing"

This song probably reached Canadian stores during the Battle of Britain in 1940, when the defence of the British Isles from German bombing attacks fell to fighter pilots from Britain and the Empire.

V for Victory

"Dot dot dot dash" became one of the most recognizable identifiers of the Allied war effort, and could be found on countless kinds of consumer goods - including sheet music.

National registration comes to Canada

According to the 1940 legislation, everyone over the age of 16 was compelled to register with the federal government, giving their personal information and employment history, to provide an inventory of the available skills that might be mobilized for the war effort.

Officer-like Qualities

The object of this manual was to give the inexperienced Temporary Officer a sense of the qualities - knowledge, loyalty, firmness, fairness - at which he should aim.

View PDF: OLQ.pdf

From a mother to her son

In its sentiment and language, this sheet music could easily have come from the First World War - only the faint image of the tank on the cover places it in the Second World War.

VE Day in Edmonton

The Alberta capital celebrated victory in the war against Nazi Germany with a public service of thanksgiving in May 1945.

"Hitler - you'll feel much littler"

This song version of the famous military march "Colonel Bogey" was recorded by the Happy Gang, one of the most popular entertainment acts in Second World War Canada.

View PDF: Good Luck.pdf

The application of infantry fire-power

This mid-Second World War manual reminded soldiers of the requirements for effective infantry fire, including accuracy, fire discipline, and the ability to judge distance.

Dad's Army in Canada

In 1939, men who were too old for combatant service could enlist in one of a number of auxiliary formations, such as the Volunteer Civil Guard, which performed ceremonial and security duties in Thorold, Ontario, when necessary.

View PDF: Thorold VCG.pdf

"We're off to finish Hitler"

Although it was probably written in 1939, this song, with its professed joy at the coming of war, sounds more like 1914.

View PDF: For Freedom.pdf

News for the Canadian forces overseas

Distributed free to Canadians in uniform, this digest included snippets of news from across the country, with a healthy dose of sports.

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