Air Raid Precautions

Be prepared for bombs

As the enemy developed new types of incendiary bombs, it was necessary to keep the public informed about new procedures - despite the fact that a fire raid on Halifax or Winnipeg was unlikely.

"I is for Incendiary"

Poetry was put to many uses during the Second World War - including recruiting volunteers to be Air Raid Wardens.

Preparing for aerial attack

The response to an air raid on Thorold, Ontario, was planned with military precision, but the plans never had to be put into action.

View PDF: Thorold ARP.pdf

Enforcing the blackout

Although the danger of an air raid on Canada seemed slight, the Defence of Canada Regulations gave the authorities special powers to enforce a blackout during air raid drills.

Air raid on Toronto !

Filled out as part of a 1942 air raid drill, these reports revealed that imaginary bombs had been dropped at Castlewood and Roselawn, Glengrove and Duplex, and Roehampton and Banff - and that 534 Roselawn Avenue was on fire.

What to wear in an air raid

Reminding women that the enemy "has no consideration for the safety of civilians," this booklet (sponsored by Orient Beauti-Skin Hosiery) provided instruction on how to keep the family and home safe against enemy air attack - including advice on what to wear when dealing with bomb damage in the neighbourhood.

Civil defence in Toronto

Although Canada was in little danger of enemy air raids, there was a fully functional civil defence apparatus during the Second World War, with civilians deputized to perform various services in the event of an attack.

Do what the warden tells you

Wartime offered considerable scope for tasteless humour - as this card, brought home from Britain by a Canadian soldier after the Second World War, affirms.

Safeguarding your home from fire bombs

Because the German Luftwaffe had used incendiary bombs with such devastating effect on Warsaw, Rotterdam, and London, Canadians were advised to be prepared for such attacks on their homes and businesses.

Turning your home into an air raid shelter

While it admitted that the possibility of an enemy air attack on Canadian soil was very remote, the federal government nevertheless advised Canadians to be prepared, by ensuring that their homes offered the maximum protection against bombs.

View PDF: Home ARP.pdf

Keeping Canada secure

As the enemy threat against Canada faded, civil defence workers turned their energies to other matters, including fighting forest fires and promoting mine safety.

View PDF: CDB Sep 1944.pdf

Guarding Canada against aerial attack

The Aircraft Detection Corps was made up of volunteers, each armed with binoculars and a handbook of aircraft silhouettes to aid in identification. Upon spotting an enemy aircraft, they were specifically requested to telephone the details to the authorities, rather than sending them through the mail.

Rehearsing for a blackout

Air raid drills and blackouts were a common feature of life in Canada during the Second World War - as this sign posted in a British Columbia hotel indicates.

Blackout for smaller shops and businesses

Part of a larger series, this booklet detailed the necessary steps in protecting small businesses from a potential air raid. Of particular importance was the various ways in which windows could be protected - either through improvised shades or the use of blackout paint.

Blackout for the home

Communities often relied on blackout techniques to conceal residential areas from enemy airmen. This booklet educated civilians on the regulations and procedures associated with preparing one's house both inside and out.